Monthly Archives: January 2013

Who Do You Think You Are?

“We see a world where the legacy that our ancestors left us is honored, where we acknowledge the good works they did in preparing this world for our arrival, and where the love they felt as they made things ready for us is felt as strong today as it was felt back then when they walked the land.”  The Vision Alignment Project

NBC’s acclaimed series, and one of my favorite TV shows “Who Do You Think You Are?,” follow celebrities as they embark on personal journeys of self-discovery to trace their family trees and roots.  During each episode, a celebrity is taken on a surprising and deeply emotional quest into his or her family history, resulting in compelling storytelling. Stories of heroism and tragedy, love and betrayal, secrets and intrigue that lie at the heart of their family history—in fact, at the heart of all our families—are shared, as each new nugget of their quest is unearthed in libraries, archives, museums and memories.

“Who Do You Think You Are?” celebrates the twists and turns of a our nation and all our ancestors who courageously took great leaps of faith in finding their way to new lands and communities in search of freedom and opportunity. Most of our ancestors lived incredibly difficult lives and often faced unspeakable discrimination, as they collectively shaped each of us and our world. A sign I spotted in a small history book shop this summer read, “If you think your life is difficult, read a history book!”

We would not be here without our ancestors. We all stand to benefit from conscious connections to our ancestors and those who have preceded us in our homes. Our ancestors are powerful allies in remembering our enduring goodness and living our authentic destiny. It is through our ancestors that we can transform our family history into healing medicine and optimum health for not only ourselves, but also simultaneously healing past and future generations. It is time for us all to wake up and fully utilize the powerful medicine waiting within our blood, bones and homes.

I look forward to uncovering your family and house history, discovering answers to your enduring questions and shaping the healing stories waiting to be told through your ancestors, your family heirlooms or your home. I have 25+ years solid experience as a professional researcher and writer, including 18 years as a historian and exhibits developer for the Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul, MN. I am passionate about any and all research and can usually find whatever you might need or want, within library and museum archives or online genealogy and other resources. I can bring to light and life any person, place or time period that peaks your curiosity.

I look forward to talking with you and discovering the possibilities, healing and stories within your family and your home. Call me at 952.431.5586 or through my contact page with your questions and your research and writing needs.

Many blessings on all we can do towards greater healing of ourselves, our families, our homes and the earth.

“Thank you for all you’ve done to help unbury some old and disturbing family secrets. While the findings are not all palatable, your research truly is bringing healing, wholeness, connection and love into my life, my family’s and the world. Blessings to you! With gratitude,” Toni Monsey, Charlotte, VT

“A Vision for Our Ancestors: We see a world where we all understand the immense difference between our lifetime and our existence; where we know that we live in eternity, and that when we leave our bodies, we persist nonetheless. Accordingly, we envision a world where all peoples everywhere are consulting those who have been here before us; where the dimensional barriers have been breached, the limited mindsets transmuted and transformed to where we are all able to communicate with our loved ones who are no longer on this earth, and where this is a common, everyday occurrence. And we see a world where the legacy that our ancestors left us is honored, where we acknowledge the good works they did in preparing this world for our arrival, and where the love they felt as they made things ready for us is felt as strong today as it was felt back then when they walked the land.”  The Vision Alignment Project

Discover more on my RESEARCH page.

Endorsements for Loris Sofia Gregory

Resolutions You Can Keep

The start of a new year is always a great time to make resolutions. This year, make a resolution to help keep our environment cleaner. It’s not as hard as you might think. Here are five easy things you can do to start making a difference.

The facts

  • More than 80 percent of what we throw away can be recycled or composted.
  • In 2011, 12 million barrels of oil were used to make the 88 billion plastic bags used in the U.S.
  • It takes 100 million trees each year to make all of the junk mail in the U.S.
  • A typical home accumulates as much as 300 pounds of unused hazardous waste over its lifetime.
  • Americans spend more than $15 billion dollars on bottled water each year—more than 40 percent of which comes from municipal taps—and only recycle 25 percent of the plastic bottles.

Do it now
Recycle one new thing
Pick one item that you don’t recycle now and start recycling it. For suggestions, check out the Residential Recycling and Disposal Guide.

Get a real bag
Pick up an inexpensive, reusable bag and put it where you won’t forget it on your way out or keep it in your car, so you have it when you need it.

Reclaim your mailbox
Remove your name from advertising lists through the Direct Mail Association at DMAchoice.org. Find more junk mail reduction tips at RethinkRecycle.org.

Switch one cleaner
Use simple ingredients to make healthier cleaners and save money. Find recipes and resources in the Guide to Healthy Household Cleaners or at your local library, or buy cleaners that are biodegradable, petroleum-free and phosphate-free.

Take up the tap
Use a refillable water bottle that is Bisphenol A (BPA)-free. If you don’t like the taste of your tap water, install carbon filters to remove the metallic or mineral taste. If you have to buy bottled water, be sure to recycle the bottle.

Courtesy Dakota County, Hastings, Minnesota, 2013.